2013-01-16

Chiseled Cross

This is certainly not a benchmark in the true sense of the word, but it may be, on a certain level, just as important.

Surveyors often set temporary marks in the course of a survey.  They may set a wood hub, or stake if the use is truly temporary, like if it's only going to be used for that day, or even a single set-up of the instrument.  For a mark with a bit more permanence, such as one intended to be used for the duration of a project, a nail and shiner in concrete or pavement, or a cross in concrete may be set.

Chiseled crosses are also used in many areas as tie marks to help identify important cadastral marks, such as property corner monuments and Public Land Survey System (PLSS) monuments (Section Corners).  Crosses such as these can be used to help re-establish the position of a lost or destroyed Section Corner when they are properly mapped and that map filed with the County Surveyor.

This cross caught my eye simply because it had been brightly painted by the crew using it that day.

Chiseled cross on top of a curb.  A surveyor can use this for just about anything, from a triangulation or tie point, as a traverse point, or even to mark a property line or corner.
Chiseled cross on top of a curb.  A surveyor can use this for just about anything, from a triangulation or tie point, as a traverse point, or even to mark a property line or corner.